Arts

Hollie Blanchard and Kelly Netishen, the Art Girls curation service

The Art Girls are constantly on the hunt for small unknown galleries and undiscovered artists they can bring into the spaces of their clients.

Even if you haven’t visited the Fairview Southdale Emergency Department lately (thank goodness), anyone who’s driven past the hospital on Highway 62 knows a major addition and renovation has occurred.

As a singer-songwriter back in high school, Greta Melcher always held onto her used guitar strings. “Jewelry seemed like the natural next step in the strings’ life cycle,” says Melcher.

Edina native Johnny Lewis will have a new album released this month. Now living in New York City, Lewis has been working in the entertainment industry for quite some time. He initially worked in electronic producing in Colorado but later decided to take a look back at his roots.

When asked what inspired Jerry Olafson to re-publish The Adventures of Happy Bunny, the answer was simple: his mother. In honor of her 100th birthday, Olafson thought it would be fitting to “freshen up and re-publish” the story that was read to him so many times as a child.

The old-school piano teacher—remember her? While there were many standouts, there were those who treated students to instruction that was as stale as the crystallized hard candy in their antique candy dishes. Repetition ruled over creativity.

An ethereal sound floats from the choir loft weekly at the Church of St. Agnes in St. Paul. The sound has an interesting Edina connection. Dr.

Michael Tang, an Edina High School senior, was selected as a featured artist for Classical Minnesota Public Radio’s Minnesota Varsity Showcase.

In her new collection of linked stories, The Enigma of Iris Murphy, Edina librarian and writer Maureen Millea Smith constructs the world of single mother and Nebraska public defender Iris Murphy. Many characters chime in to tell Iris’ tale.

Look no further than Centennial Lakes Park for a beautiful walk and a reconnection to nature. Most days in summer, you’ll also find exciting musical acts.

Olivia Chen started drawing when she was only 8 years old. Initially, Chen started sketching because of her sister, saying, “My mom signed me up for classes because my sister wanted to take them.” But Chen soon found that she liked drawing classes more than she expected.

Pages