Education

Four kids who learned coding through the Code Ninjas program pose in front of the logo.

At Code Ninjas in Edina/Richfield, kids learn to code through a game-based and robotics curriculum that weaves in teamwork, logic, math and problem solving.

One of the most common questions asked by Mathnasium students is how to study and prepare for upcoming math tests.  These “Mathletes” more often than not also suffer from test anxiety, which leads them to believe that no matter how much the

For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology, or FIRST—as in the FIRST robotics program—is an annual competition sweeping the nation.

Today they’re building robots; tomorrow they’ll change the way we do business.

Percentages can be one of the most confusing mathematical concepts for children, and even adults, to master.  Yet, an understanding of percents is critical in everyday life.  The following intuitive approach focuses on the true meaning of percents as opposed to methods that are based on rote memo

Unlike some high school juniors and seniors, Sid Ramesh and Dennis Bao are not playing video games and eating junk food after school.

The Greater Twin Cities Youth Symphonies (GTCYS) may not call Edina home, but much of its talent does. Known as “GIT-seez,” hundreds of students ages 8 to 18 take part in the program each year.

Successful problem-solving skills are based on having an intuitive sense of the problem.  That is, being able to recognize its different “parts” and how they relate to the “whole.”  In math, underdanding this relationship between numbers is called “Number Sense.”  Like most skills, Number Sense c

After Julie Greene read Lee Wolfe Blum’s book, Table in the Darkness: A Healing Journey Through an Eating Disorder, she says it resonated with her. “I wasn’t expecting it to be as moving and honest and real,” she says.

After being named one of the “100 Best Communities for Young People in America” by America’s Promise Alliance, the Edina Community Foundation went to work making su

After tutoring students one-on-one for 14 years, Edina resident Megan Stone understood that students “didn’t know how to be a student,” she says.

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