Arts

Southern Lady Code, Helen Ellis

In her fabulous new book, Southern Lady Code, Helen Ellis writes with a staccato humor about thank you notes, her mother’s quirky and completely pragmatic etiquette lessons, the secrets behind her long and happy marriage and how she went home one evening in a Burberry trench coa

While on your next spring stroll, be sure to pause and admire the public art on display in Edina. An especially eye-catching piece is a sculpture called “Bonded Souls” located near the fountain at 50th and France.

Iron sculptures by artist Jim Dehne are proving quite popular in Edina. After winning Public Art Edina people’s choice award for “Three Dancing Sandhill Cranes”—purchased by the city in 2015 and currently located in the new water feature on the Promenade—Dehne’s work won again in 2016.

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Be Frank With Me

Before Judith Guest’s first novel, Ordinary People, was published in 1976, she got a call at her Edina home from her editor at Viking Publishing. Robert Redford was interested in turning Ordinary People into a movie.

Bob Rorke’s photography was recently on display at Richardson Nature Center. He and his wife live in Edina and often walk through the Richardson Nature Center in the evening or early morning. His 14 nature images were taken at the center and spotlight the beauty of the area.

Even if you haven’t visited the Fairview Southdale Emergency Department lately (thank goodness), anyone who’s driven past the hospital on Highway 62 knows a major addition and renovation has occurred.

As a singer-songwriter back in high school, Greta Melcher always held onto her used guitar strings. “Jewelry seemed like the natural next step in the strings’ life cycle,” says Melcher.

Edina native Johnny Lewis will have a new album released this month. Now living in New York City, Lewis has been working in the entertainment industry for quite some time. He initially worked in electronic producing in Colorado but later decided to take a look back at his roots.

When asked what inspired Jerry Olafson to re-publish The Adventures of Happy Bunny, the answer was simple: his mother. In honor of her 100th birthday, Olafson thought it would be fitting to “freshen up and re-publish” the story that was read to him so many times as a child.

The old-school piano teacher—remember her? While there were many standouts, there were those who treated students to instruction that was as stale as the crystallized hard candy in their antique candy dishes. Repetition ruled over creativity.

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